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Midterms: Republicans Had a Great Story to Tell – and It Staved Off Disaster – The Larry Elder Show

As expected, Democrats regained control of the House of Representatives. But the much-anticipated “blue wave” failed to appear. History shows that the first midterm election for the party in the White House usually results in a loss, often a big loss, in that party’s House members. President Barack Obama, for example, lost 63 seats in the House and 6 seats in the Senate in the 2010 midterms. In the 21 midterm elections held from 1934 through 2014, the President’s party has gained seats in both the Senate and the House only twice: during Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s and George W. Bush’s first midterm elections. The 2018 GOP House lost seats, more than the 23 seats Democrats needed to flip, but not nearly the thumping the Democrats hoped for.

Forty Republicans — three senators and 37 representatives — chose not to run for re-election in 2018, while another 14 left their offices early or announced their resignations. This hurt. Only 18 Democrats declined to seek re-election, with another four leaving office early or resigning. From 1964 through 2016, 85 to 98 percent of House incumbents seeking re-election won.

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